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Rep. Speier Says Investigations Will Make Sure The Findings Are Public

"Irrespective of what the Mueller investigation is doing, I think it's incumbent on us to make make sure the American people are in a position to know what's going on," the California congresswoman said.
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So it's a two-prong investigation. According to Rep. Jackie Speier, multiple congressional investigations into Trump are both intended to help Robert Mueller in his investigation, and to guard against attempts by the attorney general to silence his findings.

"Isn't the Mueller investigation, in theory, looking into whether Russian money flowed into Trump properties?" New Day host John Berman asked Speier.

"Well, that's a very good question. We don't know the answer to it," she said.

"And irrespective of what the Mueller investigation is doing, I think it's incumbent on us to make make sure the American people are in a position to know what's going on. It's unclear based on what the attorney general appointee has said, whether or not we're ever going to see the Mueller report. Something that's very important to being able to get to the bottom of the Russian intervention in our election."

"Is this kind of a Mueller insurance policy, then, being taken out in case Mueller doesn't look into something or in case he doesn't find something and make it public, the Democrats want to get this information out there?" Berman asked.

"I think more than anything, it is doing the job that we were sworn do, which is determine the extent to which Russia has intervened in our election and whether or not the Trump campaign was engaged with the Russians in pursuing a plan to overturn the election," she replied.

"Have you seen evidence in terms of the money that money did flow into anything connected to the president in a way that was either illegal or proof that it influenced his decisions? Have you seen anything like that yet?"

"I have thought for a very long time that the president as a real estate developer had violated what's called the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act," she said.

"It's a requirement that anyone doing business with a foreign entity make sure that none of the money that comes into a project has been laundered. It's a concept that's hard for the average person to appreciate. What is money laundering? It's going to be our job to explain that to the American people and to determine whether or not in many of the projects, I've focused in on three, the Toronto project, the Soho project, and the Panama project, all Trump hotels, all of which went belly up at a time, particularly in the Toronto project, where not one other high-rise property was bankrupted."


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